If you Owe more than $30,000 contact us for a free case evaluation at (833) 428-0937
contact us for a free case evaluation at (833) 428-0937
Call us (833) 428-0937

SBA and Federal Debt Articles

We Provide Nationwide Representation of Small Business Owners, Personal Guarantors, and Federal Debtors with More Than $30,000 in Debt before the SBA and Treasury Department's Bureau of Fiscal Service

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SBA Articles

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Millions of Dollars in SBA Debts Resolved via Offer in Compromise and Negotiated Repayment Agreements without our Clients filing for Bankruptcy or Facing Home Foreclosure

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Millions of Dollars in Treasury Debts Defended Against via AWG Hearings, Treasury Offset Program Resolution, Cross-servicing Disputes, Private Collection Agency Representation, Compromise Offers and Negotiated Repayment Agreements

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Our Attorneys are Authorized by the Agency Practice Act to Represent Federal Debtors Nationwide before the SBA, The SBA Office of Hearings and Appeals, the Treasury Department, and the Bureau of Fiscal Service.

$1,200,000 SBA 7A LOAN - SBA OHA LITIGATION

$1,200,000 SBA 7A LOAN - SBA OHA LITIGATION

Client personally guaranteed an SBA 7(a) loan to help with a relative’s new business venture.  After the business failed, Treasury was able to secure a recurring Treasury Offset Program (TOP) levy against our client’s monthly Social Security Benefits based on the claim that he owed over $1.2 million dollars.  We initially submitted a Cross-Servicing Dispute, but then, prepared and filed an Appeals Petition with the SBA Office of Hearings and Appeals (SBA OHA).  As a result of our efforts, we were able to convince the SBA to not only terminate the claimed debt of $1.2 million dollars against our client (without him having to file bankruptcy), but also refund the past recurring amounts that were offset from his Social Security Benefits in connection with the TOP levy.

$375,000 SBA 504 LOAN - SBA OIC CASH SETTLEMENT

$375,000 SBA 504 LOAN - SBA OIC CASH SETTLEMENT

Client personally guaranteed SBA 504 loan balance of $375,000.  Debt had been cross-referred to Treasury at the time we got involved with the case.  We successfully had debt recalled to the SBA where we then presented an SBA OIC that was accepted for $58,000.

$750,000 SBA 504 LOAN - NEGOTIATED TERM REPAYMENT AGREEMENT

$750,000 SBA 504 LOAN - NEGOTIATED TERM REPAYMENT AGREEMENT

Clients personally guaranteed SBA 504 loan balance of $750,000.  Clients also pledged the business’s equipment/inventory and their home as additional collateral.  Clients had agreed to a voluntary sale of their home to pay down the balance.  We intervened and rejected the proposed home sale.  Instead, we negotiated an acceptable term repayment agreement and release of lien on the home.

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SBA FAQS
Does The Compromise With One Or More Obligor Release The Liability Of The Remaining Obligors?
Does The Compromise With One Or More Obligor Release The Liability Of The Remaining Obligors?

A compromise with one or more Obligors does not release the continuing liability of any remaining Obligors. Each entity or individual responsible for the debt must develop its/his/her own SBA OIC.

What are the criteria for a business to file under Subchapter V?
What are the criteria for a business to file under Subchapter V?

To be eligible for this option, a debtor must meet the following criteria:

  • Engaged in commercial activity
  • Total debts must be less than $2,725,725 (both secured and unsecured)
  • At least half of the debts must be due to business activity
  • The principal activity is not a single-asset real estate operation

The CARES Act further expanded the eligibility for businesses to qualify under this bankruptcy path.

This legislation increases the eligibility pool to also include companies with up to $7,500,000 in debt (both secured and unsecured) to reorganize under Subchapter V. This is a significant increase from the otherwise limit of $2,725,625.

What Types Of SBA Loans Are Available?
What Types Of SBA Loans Are Available?

Most SBA loans fall under two categories: 7(a) and 504.In an SBA 7(a) transaction, a loan is secured from a private sector lender and, provided that the lender and borrower have satisfied the requirements of the SBA, if the borrower defaults on the loan, the SBA will reimburse the lender for a percentage on the loan loss (usually 75% or 85%, depending on various factors).In an SBA 504 transaction, typically, a loan is secured from a private sector lender with a first position lien covering up to 50% of the project cost, and a second loan is secured from a private sector lender with a junior lien position covering up to 40% of the project cost, and the borrower makes a contribution of equity equal to at least 10% of the project cost. After the closing of the first and second loans, and provided that the lender and borrower have complied with the requirements of the SBA, a debenture is sold to investors, the proceeds of which pays off the second loan, whereupon the second loan is assigned to a Certified Development Company (“CDC”) and then to the SBA, which provides a 100% guarantee of the debenture.The existence of the SBA’s guarantee in each of these transactions is an inducement for the lender to make a loan on terms it would otherwise not make. However, the SBA guarantee does not allow the lender to disregard standard commercial underwriting principles such as collateral and personal guarantees. The SBA guarantee does allow the lender to loan more money, extend longer terms, and approve loans to less mature businesses than it otherwise would.The SBA’s purpose under these financing programs is to help businesses gain more access to capital, thereby creating jobs and expanding the tax base. Pursuant to the Small Business Jobs Act of 2010 (“2010 Act”), the maximum SBA guarantee to the lender on a 7(a) loan was increased to $5,000,000; and on a 504 Loan, the maximum debenture amount was increased to $5,000,000.

What is an SBA Loan Deferment?
What is an SBA Loan Deferment?

An SBA Loan Deferment is a temporary remedial option. If your business is having short term financial difficulty because of a seasonal slump and can reasonably prove through pro forma financial statements to your lender or CDC that a turnaround is around the corner and you need brief relief from paying on the SBA loan, you should consider applying for a deferment. Generally, if you qualify, your bank or CDC, with the SBA’s approval can provide you with either a six (6) month or twelve (12) month reprieve from paying either the principal amount (and allow interest-only payments) or no principal and interest. However, if you consider this option, be advised that you may be asked to reaffirm the loan with personal guarantees or even pledge additional collateral. Needless to say, this is not an option that you should consider without either representation or consultation with a qualified practitioner.

What is an SBA Loan Modification?
What is an SBA Loan Modification?

An SBA Loan Modification is a remedial option when the business is still a viable concern, is still generating revenue and due to current circumstances, the old loan terms just do not make financial sense for all parties. A loan modification package is generally presented when it involves a SBA 504 Loan and the collateral or building’s fair market value has decreased significantly such that the loan should probably be modified (i.e. principal and interest payment terms, modification of principal loan balance to reflect current fair market value appraisal of real estate collateral, payment schedule etc.). In this situation, special factors need to be evaluated, appraisals will need to be conducted, and a proposal should be made in order to apply for a loan modification which benefits both parties. Again, the borrower will be required to provide updated business and personal financial information, additional pledged collateral may be requested, and appraisals will be done as part of the modification process. This is not a situation where the borrower or guarantor should engage in this process without qualified representation or consultation. However, if the business feels that it doesn’t need assistance, we recommend that you review applicable SBA SOPs and the Code of Federal Regulations (CFRs) prior to presenting your loan modification application.

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